Tag Archives: Tour Guide

Blue Badge Tour Guide FAQs

blue badgeWhat is the Blue Badge?

What is the benefit of hiring a Blue Badge Guide?

What is the difference between the Blue Badge and a Green Badge?

How much does it cost to hire a Blue Badge Guide?

Can I book a Blue Badge Guide for just one day?

How can I tell if my guide really has a Blue Badge?

Can anyone join your tours?

Are there any hidden extra costs?

If you would like to book a Blue Badge Guide, contact me to discuss your requirements.

Q and A – Part 3

What’s the best thing about being a Blue Badge Guide?

There are lots of things I like about it but I’ll pick just a few.  Firstly, the opportunity to show off the best of our country to visitors from all over the world.  Whether I’m helping local people find out things they never knew about their home city, or taking international guests to famous attractions, sharing my knowledge and the locations themselves with people is something that gives me a real thrill.  Secondly, working with all kinds of different people from a huge range of backgrounds.  Especially on multi-day tours, you have a chance to talk to them about all kinds of things.  Thirdly, it is a job that allows me to pursue my own interest in history, culture and discovering new places.  Making a living out of something you love doing and that gives people enjoyment is a privilege that I truly appreciate.

And the worst thing?

Like any freelance job, probably the lack of stability and uncertainty of work is the worst thing.  Also if uncontrollable circumstances such as adverse weather, traffic jams or whatever interfere with an itinerary, as this makes me feel bad for the people on the tour, even though it is not my fault.

What’s your favourite countryside in England?

I enjoy getting out into all countryside areas to be honest, and I would recommend rural England to anyone.  In fine weather, there is nowhere to match it.  But if I had to pick a favourite, it would be the Peak District.  It has a great combination of gentle and more dramatic scenery, along with some attractive and interesting towns and villages, such as Matlock and Buxton.  There are also excellent places to visit like Chatsworth House and Haddon Hall, both of which I highly recommend, and love taking groups to.  Growing up in Nottingham, it was an area that I’ve known since I was a child from school trips, walking and youth hostelling holidays in my teens, and when I learned to drive I spent numerous days cruising around the roads and lanes of the area.  I know most of the routes there very well, which leads to some strange looks from coach drivers, when I direct them down an unexpected road during a tour.

For the ultimate English tea?

One of the pleasures of my work is the need to try out local places to eat and drink in locations I’m going to be visiting with groups (purely for research you understand).  So I consider myself something of a connoiseur of tea shops.  There is something quintessentially English about afternoon tea, especially in rural areas, and they are popular with most visitors.  Among many excellent places I have found, my favourite is Juri’s, which is in Winchcome in the Cotswolds.  It is run by a Japanese family, and the owner is a fellow Blue Badge Guide who qualified on the same course as I did.  You don’t just have to take my word for how good it is, they won the “National Tea Shop of the Year” award from the English Tea Council a couple of years ago!

Q and A Part 2

So here are some more questions about me and my work as a guide…

What do you do when you’re not guiding?

Alongside my guiding, I work as a freelance German-English translator.  I am fluent in German – which I am also fully qualified to guide in – and the combination works well as I can do as many tours as possible and take translation work for other times.  When I’m not working I love to read, either novels or books on history and travel.  I also spend a lot of time listening to music – varied styles but rock music is my favourite – and attempting to play the guitar.  I am a keen sports fan, especially ice hockey, which I have been watching since the age of 7, cricket and football.  I try to keep fit by running, swimming and walking.  As you might expect, travel is a big passion and I am always finding new places to explore, in this country and others.

What is your favourite castle?

To be honest, I think that most castles are fantastic places to visit, as they have links to some of the great people and events in history.  Many are also very impressive buildings in scenic locations too. If I had to pick one, however, it would be Kenilworth Castle.  Mainly in ruins, it has enough of its buildings left to retain some of the atmosphere of its glorious past, while its countryside setting and sandstone construction make it extremely picturesque, especially when the sun shines on its walls and makes them glow.  I prefer exploring ruined castles with my imagination and a good guide to visiting better preserved or reconstructed ones with costumed staff and the like, as I think this helps to bring the place to life much more effectively.

And what about stately homes or country houses?

Again, they are fascinating places, as each has its own stories.  While I am keen on what I would call “big history” – kings and queens, great events and so on – my real love is social history, and I am intrigued to discover as much as I can about the people who lived and worked in places, what they might have been like and how they lived.  The best houses manage to convey this effectively through their choice of how they present themselves.  Generally, I tend to prefer smaller ones to the huge palaces, but I have to make one exception here as my absolute favourite is Burghley House near Stamford in Lincolnshire.  Everything about it is impressive, from the architecture to the gardens to the absolutely stunning paintings and wall decorations to the presentation of the house and the family who created it.  Every time I go there, I am amazed all over again and I highly recommend a visit if you haven’t had the chance yet.

Where do you most like to unwind with a well-earned drink after a tour?

My drink of choice is real ale, and I’m fortunate that I get to sample the delights of local pubs and brews throughout England.  It is hard to mention just one favourite but if I had to choose it would be the Red Lion, in Birmingham’s Jewellery Quarter.  It is a small local pub with a long tradition, and serves superb food and a great choice of regional ales.  Our Birmingham Graveyard Ghost Walks finish there too, so I do literally get to unwind and refresh my vocal chords after tours there on quite a regular basis!

Are there any hidden extra costs?

blue badgeThere are no hidden costs, but there may be additional ones. If you book a Blue Badge Guide for a tour that involves staying away from home, you will be responsible for the cost of the guide’s accommodation, evening meals and soft drinks. You may also be required to pay the guide’s travel expenses to and from your meeting point, and you will need to pay for their entry ticket to any places that do not offer free entry to Blue Badge Guides.

However, your guide will agree all charges with you beforehand, so there will be no nasty surprises at the end of your tour.

Can anyone join your tours?

blue badgeI offer two types of tours: public and private. The public walking tours are run by me and a colleague, Michael, and take place in Birmingham on Saturdays, and anybody is welcome to join these. You will find details of times and prices at Midlands Discovery Tours. Michael and I also offer public ghost walks in Birmingham, Sutton Coldfield and Warwick and details of these can also be found at Midlands Discovery Tours.

Private walks are ones I have been booked for by a particular group or organisation, and these are limited to people that belong to that particular group.

Anyone can book a private tour – I have done tours for tourist groups, corporate incentive schemes, schools, birthday parties, business trips, office nights out, book clubs and music fans, to name just a few examples – so if this is something that would interest you, get in touch

How can I tell if my guide really has a Blue Badge?

blue badgeYour guide should have a physical badge, like the one pictured. They will probably be wearing it, either pinned to a lapel or on a lanyard, when they meet you. If you can’t see it, you are entitled to ask them to show it to you. You will also find them listed in the Institute of Tourist Guiding Directory – here’s my entry.

Guides should also have an ID card confirming the badge they hold and their membership of a professional organisation.

What is the Blue Badge?

blue badgeThe Blue Badge is the highest level of qualification there is for guiding in the UK. It takes between one and two years of study to earn. Each badge covers one region, which includes several counties. For example, mine is for the Heart of England which covers the counties of Gloucestershire, Herefordshire, Oxfordshire, Shropshire, Staffordshire, Warwickshire, West Midlands and Worcestershire.

The course covers guiding techniques for walking tours and coach tours, and how to research and design a tour as well as all the relevant knowledge. Guides are expected to be able to talk about national level topics such as history, education, politics, architecture and art, in addition to having specific local knowledge.

The assessment process is rigorous with 4 written exams, 4 practical exams and coursework. There is also an additional exam for anyone who wishes to guide in a language other than English.  I took the language exam for German, so that is also covered by my qualification.